Type III verbs

From LingWiki

Jump to: navigation, search

In Japanese, the term Type III verb refers to the two verbs that are irregular in plain/polite speech, 来る (kuru) and する (suru), as well as verbs formed by appending する to a noun. It does not include honorific verbs that use irregular imperative forms, nor does it include verbs which use special verbs in place of the usual pattern for creating honorific or humble forms.

Contents

Verb Chart

The chart below shows the conjugations of the two Type III verbs. For verbs ending in する (suru), it conjugates the same way that する (suru) would on its own without the noun preceding it.

Plain,
Affirmative
Plain,
Negative
Polite,
Affirmative
Polite,
Negative
Nonpast 来る
kuru
する
suru
来ない
konai
しない
shinai
来ます
kimasu
します
shimasu
来ません
kimasen
しません
shimasen
Past 来た
kita
した
shita
来なかった
konakatta
しなかった
shinakatta
来ました
kimashita
しました
shimashita
来ませんでした
kimasen deshita
しませんでした
shimasen deshita
Conjunctive 来て
kite
して
shite
来なくて、来ないで
konakute, konai de
しなくて、しないで
shinakute, shinai de
来まして
kimashite
しまして
shimashite
来ませんで
kimasen de
しませんで
shimasen de
Conditional 来たら
kitara
したら
shitara
来なかったら
konakattara
しなかったら
shinakattara
来ましたら
kimashitara
しましたら
shimashitara
きませんでしたら
kimasen deshitara
しませんでしたら
shimasen deshitara
Provisional 来れば
kureba
すれば
sureba
来なければ
konakereba
しなければ
shinakereba
来ますなら
kimasu nara
しますなら
shimasunara
来ませんなら
kimasen nara
しませんなら
shimasen nara
Potential 来られる
korareru
出来る
dekiru
来られない
korarenai
出来ない
dekinai
来られます
koraremasu
出来ます
dekimasu
来られません
koraremasen
出来ません
dekimasen
Passive 来られる
korareru
される
sareru
来られない
korarenai
されない
sarenai
来られます
koraremasu
されます
saremasu
来られません
koraremasen
されません
saremasen
Causative 来させる
kosaseru
させる
saseru
来させない
kosasenai
させない
sasenai
来させます
kosasemasu
させます
sasemasu
来させません
kosasemasen
させません
sasemasen
Causative-
Passive
来させられる
kosaserareru
させられる
saserareru
来させられない
kosaserarenai
させられない
saserarenai
来させられます
kosaseraremasu
させられます
saseraremasu
来させられません
kosaseraremasen
させられません
saseraremasen
Volitional 来よう
koyou
しよう
shiyou
来ないようにしよう
konai you ni shiyou
しないようにしよう
shinai you ni shiyou
来ましょう
kimashou
しましょう
shimashou
来ないようにしましょう
konai you ni shimashou
しないようにしましょう
shinai you ni shimashou
Conjectural 来るだろう
kuru darou
するだろう
suru darou
来ないだろう
konai darou
しないだろう
shinai darou
来るでしょう
kuru deshou
するでしょう
suru deshou
来ないでしょう
konai deshou
しないでしょう
shinai deshou
Sequental 来たり
kitari
したり
shitari
来なかったり
konakattari
しなかったり
shinakattari
来ましたり
kimashitari
しましたり
shimashitari
来ませんでしたり
kimasen deshitari
しませんでしたり
shimasen deshitari
Imperative 来い
koi
しろ
shiro
来るな
kuru na
するな
suru na
来なさい
kinasai
しなさい
shinasai
来なさるな
kinasaru na
しなさるな
shinasaru na

Polite Stem

Tense

Nonpast Tense

The present tense in Japanese also serves as the future tense, and thus for technical reasons is usually referred to as the nonpast tense. In plain speech, it is simply the dictionary form of the verb. For example, the verb する (suru, to do) remains unchanged if we just want to say "I do" (私はする。Watashi wa suru.) In polite speech, also known as ます-form (masu-form), we take the verb stem (し, shi) and add ます (masu) to the end of it, thus creating 私はします。 (Watashi wa shimasu.)

Creating the Future Tense

As the present tense also doubles as the future tense, either of the examples above could also be translated as "I will do [it]", with the context of the situation determining the time frame. If it is necessary to explicitly indicate that the action taking place is in the future, つもりです (tsumori desu) may be added after the dictionary form of the verb (thus, 私はするつもりです。, Watashi wa suru tsumori desu.). This construction places the event in the future by stating that it is what the speaker plans to do. In casual speech, the です at the end may be dropped or changed to its plain form, .

Negative Form

Conjunctive Form

Te conjunctive form serves two purposes in Japanese:

  1. To link two verbs together
  2. To link two sentences together

Imperative Form

There are three common ways of forming the imperative in Japanese, each with their nuances:

  1. Use the conjunctive form (て form)
  2. Add なさい (nasai)
  3. Use the explicit imperative conjugation

Using the て Form

The conjunctive form is the gentlest way of making a request or issuing an order in Japanese. While the conjunctive form can be used on its own, this is generally seen as rather both more casual and more feminine in tone. A more formal request using the conjunctive form, as well as one that men would be expected to use, would place the verb 下さい (kudasai, imperative of "to receive") after the conjunctive form of the verb (e.g. 食べる would become 食べて下さい (tabete kudasai). Another, more casual, alternative for men would be to substitute くれ (kure) for 下さい (kudasai).

Using なさい

Replace the 〜る (-ru) ending of the dictionary form with 〜なさい (-nasai).

Explicit Imperative

Changing the 〜る (-ru) ending of the dictionary form to 〜ろ (-ro) is considered the harshest and most clear means of issuing an order in Japanese. It is generally considered to be extremely rude, and is almost never heard used by women.

Negated Imperative

There are two primary ways to issue an order not to do something in Japanese:

  • Use the negative conjunctive (〜ないで, -nai de) ending instead of the regular one, optionally following it with 〜下さい (-kudasai) or 〜くれ (-kure)
  • Adding 〜な (-na) after the dictionary form of the verb
    • For a more formal alternative, you use the polite stem followed by 〜なさるな (-nasaru na) instead

Conditional Form

Causative Form

Passive Form

Honorific and Humble Forms

See Also

Personal tools